30
Mar

Medieval Clothing…?

   Posted by: tyankee7   in medieval clothing

Concern by SAYwhat?!: Medieval Clothing…?
what does a cotter/farmer use in the medieval occasions, and what ought to be in the backround, cruck house…anything else????
Many thanks
women cotter

Greatest response:

Response by Choqs
Go to about.com they have a complete segment on what girls wore in the medieval ages as effectively as all sorts of other details

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2 comments so far

Elise K
 1 

This website has several pictures from the Luttrell Psalter, a book illustrated in the 14th century. (Scroll down about halfway):

http://www.wealddown.co.uk/Magazine/Spring%202006/magazine-spring-2006-part1.htm

You’ll notice the men wearing long sleeved, knee-length tunics, close fitting “hosen”, boots that come up to their mid-shin, and either hoods or hats (and in a couple cases, both).

The women are wearing simple dresses with long sleeves that fit closely over their forearm. You’ll notice one woman is also wearing two aprons: a bib type pinned at her shoulders, and another one tied at her waist. They also wear hair coverings: two of them have their hair wrapped in a scarf-like thing (this was called a “guimple”) and the others are wearing hoods similar to the men, although open at the front (a detail you can’t see in these pictures is that the hoods often had a button that could be fastened under the chin if the wearer so desired).

Long sleeves were generally worn even the summer – remember they didn’t have sunscreen! And the sleeves would also protect the farmer from nicks and scratches and from getting itchy chaff on their skin. The hats/guimples likewise protected from the sun and from getting stuff you didn’t want in your hair.

March 30th, 2014 at 7:41 pm
Karen_Larsdatter
 2 

You can get more ideas from the Luttrell Psalter at http://www.luttrellpsalter.org.uk or by searching for “Luttrell” at http://www.imagesonline.bl.uk

Many (though not all) of the images linked to from http://www.larsdatter.com/strawhats.htm also depict medieval farmers.

Another good source of images of 15th and early 16th century farmers at work are some of the illustrations in books of hours. Here are some with good images of farm life (for at least some of the months in the Books of Hours):

The Tres Riches Heures of the Duc de Berry
http://humanities.uchicago.edu/images/heures/heures.html

The Grimani Breviary
http://www.wga.hu/html/zgothic/miniatur/1451-500/21griman/index.html

The Da Costa Hours
http://www.themorgan.org/collections/collectionsList.asp?id=Medren (scroll down towards the bottom of the page)

The Hennessey Hours
http://www.kikirpa.be/www2/cgi-bin/wwwopac.exe?DATABASE=object&LANGUAGE=0&OPAC_URL=&%250=20027226

There’s some more good illustrations of farmers in some illustrations in the Tacuinum Sanitatis, a medieval guide to health. You can find some of these illustrations online, at the website for the French national library:

Go to http://mandragore.bnf.fr/jsp/rechercheExperte.jsp

In the box marked “Cote,” enter either
Latin 9333
or
Nouvelle acquisition latine 1673

Click “Chercher”

Click “Images”

March 30th, 2014 at 8:32 pm

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